GHS Labels

7 Signs Your GHS Labels Are Not Compliant

7 Signs Your Ghs Labels Are Not Compliant-1

Many chemical products – from washing fluids to industrial glue – can be dangerous if misused. It has, however, long been a legal requirement to place warning labels on packaging to prevent users from mishandling these products and causing injury.

Until 2002, there was no universal set of warning labels for chemical products. The Globally Harmonized System of Classification And Labelling of Chemicals (often abbreviated to GHS) solved this with a set of strict rules regarding hazardous materials labeling. This system aimed to ensure that companies were clearly communicating hazards and that warnings weren’t merely hiding them in the small print.

Most of us understand the importance of placing GHS compliant labels on chemical products – failure to do so could result in regulators taking your goods off the shelves. However, not all of us understand the specifics of what a GHS label should look like – something which could also lead the authorities to stop you from selling your products. Here are just several signs of that your GHS label may not be compliant. Some of them may seem petty, but they could be essential if you want to avoid a product recall.

You Haven’t Put a Red Boundary Around the Pictograms

pictograms-bnw

Many companies think that they can rely on black and white printed packaging to save costs. However, a splash of color is mandatory.

All pictograms on labels are legally required to have a red border. The logic behind this is that it helps these warning labels to stand out so that more people actually read them and don’t just gloss over them.

You’ve Smeared the Ink

Smeared ink on a GHS label distorts the text and could mean that it is no longer compliant.

Ink smearing can be down to various issues. For instance, you may not be using the correct printing material – if you’re using a regular ink on a slippery surface, it may instantly smear. Smeared ink may also be the result of a printing issue that you may be able to solve with printing diagnostics.

Statements Don’t Accompany Your Pictograms

Solely relying on pictograms to warn consumers of dangers isn’t enough. Specific symbols may not be visible or detailed enough, and so you may need to give extra information.
These are known as hazard statements, and they should be short and concise while telling the user everything they need to know. A good example could be ‘Many chemical products – from washing fluids to industrial glue – can be dangerous if misused. It has, however, long been a legal requirement to place warning labels on packaging to prevent users from mishandling these products and causing injury.

Until 1992, there was no universal set of warning labels for chemical products. The Globally Harmonized System of Classification And Labelling of Chemicals (often abbreviated to GHS) solved this with a set of strict rules regarding chemical labeling. This system aimed to ensure that companies were clearly advertising hazards and that warnings weren’t merely hiding them in the small print.

Most of us understand the importance of printing GHS labels on chemical products – failure to do so could result in regulators taking your goods off the shelves. However, not all of us understand the specifics of what a GHS label should look like – something which could also lead the authorities to stop you from selling your products. Here are just several signs of that your GHS label may not be compliant. Some of them may seem petty, but they could be essential if you want to avoid a product recall.

The Text/Pictogram Is so Small That You Have to Squint to Read It

Small That You Have to Squint to Read It

The size of your safety labels matters: if they’re too small, they may be unreadable and therefore not compliant.

Consumers should be able to make out any pictograms. On a 3 liter container, symbols should be no smaller than 10 x 10mm.

Meanwhile, you shouldn’t have to strain to read the text either. Anything under font size six could be too small.

Also Read: 10 GHS Facts You Need To Know

You Have to Turn Your Head 90 Degrees to Read the Text

On top of not being too small, the positioning of text on your warning label is critical. You should avoid writing words vertically – this may require consumers to tip their head and may make it easier to miss any warning. Keep the text on your GHS label horizontal so that it’s much easier to read.

You Have Not Translated Your Label into Local Languages

local languages

You can also get into trouble with regulators for not translating your label when selling your product abroad. While people speak English throughout the world, there may still be some customers abroad that do not speak a word of it. To make your chemical product compliant in that country – you may have to invest in translation services to help write out your warning in the local language. Check the rules on language protocols by state.

Want to Learn More About Ghs Labels Through HCL Labels?

Here at HCL, we can take the stress out of producing a GHS label. We’ll make sure that you comply with all the rules so that you can avoid setbacks. For more information on our services, feel free to call us at 800-421-6710.

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